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Studio Sticky-Back Canvas

Reported by Erin Bassett
As someone who dabbles in mixed media projects, I was thrilled when I first found out about Claudine Hellmuth Studio Sticky-Back Canvas. Using the Sticky-Back Canvas allows crafters the ability to add the nice texture of canvas to projects that they wouldn’t easily be able to create with bolts of canvas fabric or stretched canvas art boards.
One of the first things I tested was how well gesso, ink, and Glimmer Mist took to it. -They all did so wonderfully. I tested them out by making a bookmark. I cut out a 1 1/2” x 4 3/4” piece of Sticky-Back Canvas and with my finger applied Studio Gesso on top of it. I then allowed it to dry for a few minutes, and then stamped on it with black Stazon ink.
After the ink was dry I sprayed it with two colors of Glimmer Mist. I love how the gesso resits the mist, but the canvas soaked it right up.
Next, I removed the paper liner on the back of the Sticky-Back Canvas and stuck it on a coordinating scrap of seersucker fabric I had.
The Sticky-Back Canvas adhered to the fabric really well, but I still added some decorative stitches with my sewing machine. Lastly, I frayed the edges of my fabric.
For my next project I wanted to see how well my Cricut Expression would do cutting out a design so I decided to make a flower pin.
The Sticky-Back Canvas cut very well using the standard Cricut blade. There was one little corner that I had to snip with my scissors, but other than that, my Cricut Expression cut through it like butter.
Once I had my flowers cut out I used Studio Acrylic paint to paint them and then I let them dry.
After they were dry I decided to run them through my Cuttlebug to see if it would emboss like paper would. Guess what? It does! On my first test one I just ran a piece of Sticky-Back Canvas (with the backing on it) through the Cuttlebug…it worked! For another test I cut out a flower out of Bazzill cardstock with my Cricut and adhered the Sticky-Back Canvas directly to the cardstock flower to give it some support. I then ran it through the Cuttlebug and it worked just as well. After embossing the flowers I rubbed brown ink over the top of them to further enhance the embossing.
You can see a video of how to make a flower pin like the one I made above.
Also, check out this video on how Tim Holtz uses Sticky-Back Canvas to create a brad with an Imaginisce i-Top brad maker.
Pros:
  • Acid-free, non-toxic adhesive
  • Heat gun can be used on it
  • Many, many media can be used on in to decorate it
  • Can be cut with electronic & manual die-cut machines
  • Easy to sew through
Cons:
  • The canvas is lightweight, so you may need to adhere it to something stiffer to support it.
  • Only comes in 8 1/2” x 11” and 12” x 12” sheets, so people who do larger projects will have to attach multiple pieces together to get the size they need.
Have you had a chance to play with Sticky-Back Canvas yet? Show us the link to your project…we’d love to take a look!
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6 Responses to Studio Sticky-Back Canvas

  1. Maria Matter May 28, 2010 at 11:36 am #

    never heard of this…
    thanks for the review!

    your projects are gorgeous!
    Blessings!

  2. Samantha T. May 28, 2010 at 1:09 pm #

    I LOVE this stuff. Another great use: you can run the 8 1/2″ x 11″ size through your printer. Here are 2 examples – the first are my photos printed for a book (scroll to the bottom of the post), the second are vintage ads. It looks much better in person, as the canvas gives a softer more vintage look.
    http://taylorstamped.blogspot.com/2010/04/scraptivty-april-kit-part-2.html

    http://taylorstamped.blogspot.com/2010/02/more-fun-playing-along.html

  3. Pam May 28, 2010 at 5:08 pm #

    This comment has been removed by the author.

  4. Pam May 28, 2010 at 5:22 pm #

    Your projects are cute! I especially like your flower pin.

    I’ve used it before. I like it but find it to be very similar to something called canvas paper which can be found in art supply stores & the art sections of craft stores & comes in a pad. My pad of canvas paper is 9 x 12 inches. I believe it’s less expensive than the Sticky-Back canvas. Aside from the adhesive, I’m not sure of any benefits of the Sticky Back Canvas over the canvas paper.

  5. Mel M. M. McCarthy February 23, 2011 at 2:47 am #

    Fantastic, Erin! I especially love that you showed all the details of cutting in the cricut. That painter’s tape trick is inspired.

  6. michelle renée bernard November 30, 2011 at 9:44 am #

    Great review. I love StickyBack Canvas. And it’s also available in ATC size too. It’s just marketed under Ranger’s Inkssentials line.