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Review | Mepxy Brush Markers

Mepxy markers are manufactured by a family owned business in Seoul, Korea and are now being sold in the United States.  These alcohol ink markers give Anime artists, calligraphy artists, and crafters more choices in alcohol ink markers with their growing product line.  They even have blog dedicated to artists with a fun gallery and ideas for using the markers.  I first learned about these from watching one of Linda Peterson’s “YouTube” video on how to transfer images onto plastic.  She is a well known multi media artist who makes some really fun “how to” videos that you can learn various techniques from.


Anyway, the Mepxy 12 colors basic alcohol marker set contained:

  • B06 Peacock Blue
  • L07 Natural Green
  • 006 Cadmium Orange
  • V06 Iris Purple
  • C05 Cyan
  • M09 Magenta
  • P04 Lavender
  • W07 Light Mahogany
  • G07 Vivid Green
  • N18 Sepia
  • R08 Vermilion
  • Y06 Bright Yellow

and separately, I got:

  • 00 Colorless Blending Pen
  • Marker Blending Palette
There are many different configurations of the sets available at the retail store.  This is just a review of the set that I have and my findings after testing this product on a variety of surfaces.  First of all, the colors are high pigment that makes for a very rich color.  I made a color chart so you could see how they look on ivory card stock.
The inks are also translucent which makes blending the inks very easy to accomplish.  I did a sample blending using  two of the colored ink markers and the colorless blending brush.
They all worked very well together and I was quite pleased. The dots pattern on the dress was done with the colorless blender pen.
 The colorless blender pen is used to remove excess ink from the image or to blend colors.
Like the other quality alcohol ink markers in the market place, these markers come with two tips.  The marker has a fine brush tip on one side
and a wide chisel tip on the other.
I read that the ink is toner friendly and won’t react to it nor would it remove images from it.  So I did my own test on this.  I used five colors and none of them lifted the image from the paper.
The ink did, however, leak through to the back side of the paper.  I think I can attribute this to the fact that the paper is the least expensive printer paper that I could find and it is very thin.
Next I decided to test them on a rubber surface, so I picked up my favorite stamp and tried putting the ink directly onto the stamp.  I tried the chisel tip first,
as you can see that did not work out well.
Then I tried the fine brush tip,
which gave a far better result.  You should know that depending on the surface, the ink dries quickly, so plan accordingly.  A friend of mine who is an avid stamper suggest that I blow on the inked stamp surface to keep it moist a little longer.  It worked and the result is below.
This process is not recommended by the manufacturer.  I just wanted to see if I could use them that way for future reference.
For my first project, I stamped a design onto one of those flame less candles that are so popular today.  I  filled in the color with the Mepxy markers.  They are so translucent that I could still enjoy the flame effect without the design blocking it.
I tried them on different surfaces to see how they looked.  I started by testing them on wire hooks.  I used the markers to color the wire and it worked perfectly.
Then I tried it on a cut up piece of aluminum soda can that I had run through my big shot machine.  This also worked really well.
So I decide to try test them on some plain cloth flowers.  I took apart the flowers and used the yellow color to paint the center of the petals.  I let them dry for about a half hour. Then I proceeded to wet the outer surface of the petals (one at a time) with the colorless blender pen which was immediately followed by inking the surface with the orange marker.
The finished flowers looked great.  I liked the vibrancy of the colors and I think the colored flowers are much cuter than the original plain flower.
Then I decided to see how these would work on canvas that has been prepped with gesso.  I wanted to see if I could get a paint brush look with these markers.  I covered the canvas with a very thick coat of gesso using a small flat brush so that the strokes would show after the gesso dried.  Once it was dried I used the markers to paint the gesso and add color to the canvas.
Then I used some clear alcohol (in this case it was some vodka that was left over from a different craft project) to see how that would affect the ink.  The alcohol helped blend the inks on the gesso which is good to know if I run out of ink in the blender pen in the middle of a project.
The alcohol also seemed to give the ink a sheen which looks pretty cool.
My second project was to combine some the tested elements to make a fun wall hanging for my daughter who really wants to go to Paris.
For my third project, I tested the markers out some wood domino pieces.  I stamped the image on the wood piece.  Then I used a heat gun to make sure the ink was dry before I colored in the design with the Mepxy alcohol markers.
I added some beads and used metal mesh to make it into a fun necklace.  For more fun ideas and inspiration that can be applied to working with alcohol ink markers, check out my article on “Altered Art Circus” and “Fine Art Weekend Event“.  For rubber stamping we have some amazing articles on Craft Critique that provide some additional inspiration.  Just use our handy search box and enter the words “rubber stamping” and you will see some great links to past articles.
As for the Mepxy markers, I found that they also work great on shrink plastic, air dry clay, epoxy clay pieces, lace, assorted papers, various metals, and more.  I enjoyed the versatility of these markers and the intensity of the pigmented alcohol inks.  They are very easy to work with, however, I can not stress enough that once the ink is applied to a surface, it will dry quickly.   Make sure to plan your project with this in mind.  Personally, I love that it dries quickly because it lets me move on to the next project phase.
The markers are also sold individually at around $5.99 (but I found them for less) which makes it easy to collect the colors you like.  The sets retail for $71.88 but again, a google search listed them at several retailers for around $49.99 and up.  These markers would be great for the professional artist, art students, journaling, or crafters.  My kids love them for doing anime drawings because of the smooth flow of the ink and the double ended tip.
Pros
  • The colors are rich and the markers are refillable.
  • The ink goes onto surfaces very smoothly and blend beautifully.
  • Love the double tips on these, they are very handy and replaceable.
  • The chisel end has sharper tips than some of the other brands that I have tried which makes it easier to use the edges for special effects.
  • The color name & number is marked on both tips, so you can always find the color and match the cap back to the marker.
Cons
  • The basic set does not have a traditional selection of primary colors.  That would be nice to have to begin building a collection.  I did a search and found them for sale by individual colors which would make it easier to create a personalized collection of colors that meets my personal needs.
  • The ink is not compatible with StāzOn ink so plan your project accordingly (it is common knowledge that one should not use alcohol inks with solvent inks but I think it is helpful to remind readers).
  • These are rich colors and will seep through cheaper quality paper, so take that into consideration when planning your projects.

We would love to hear from our readers if they use alcohol markers in their crafting projects and if they have any tips for using them? Also, what are your favorite multi-media products?


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Maria Del Pinto

Maria Del Pinto

I have been crafting since I was a child and I love seeing what others create. I live near the beach so everything around me inspires me. I also enjoy activities where I re-purpose something old & discarded & make it into something cool. My favorite mantra is "Re-use, recycle, and re-make".
Maria Del Pinto

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13 Responses to Review | Mepxy Brush Markers

  1. Jan Castle February 14, 2012 at 3:20 pm #

    I love my alcohol markers (Copics)….I find you can color and blend easily….if usung good paper, you can keep coloring and blending with no balling of the paper. There are also papers that do not bleed (120 pound)….but I just use mine as a layer so it does not matter that the ink shows thru to the back of your colored page. I use Memento ink for the stamped image. The blending is unique with alcohol markers and easy to achieve…happy to know there are alcohol marker options now.

  2. Robyn L. Coburn February 14, 2012 at 3:52 pm #

    I saw these at CHA and was very interested. I loved learning how to use the fine brush tip to lift a tiny amount of the next color from their paper palette for blending. I would like to use them for my art doll faces over acrylic paints.

    Thanks for the review. You can use ScraPerfect’s Perfect Crafting Pouch to dry inks including stamps instantly, if you need to. The new Best Cleaner Ever will clean your rubber stamps too – even dried Stazon inks come off instantly. I’m sure it would clean Mepxy inks from stamps too.

  3. Kathy February 15, 2012 at 8:59 am #

    Like having a third choice for alcohol markers, and these sound like they are going to work well on projects!

  4. Karen (TLgirl353) February 15, 2012 at 9:11 am #

    Thank you for a wonderfully written review. You mentioned that you kept having to open both sides to find the tip you needed. I did a little research online, and did notice that on the brush end, there is a narrow line around the barrel and on the chisel end, there is a wide line. Actually that is easier to use than the little tip images on Copic markers.

  5. Julie February 15, 2012 at 12:32 pm #

    These look interesting. Nice to have another option in markers. I would love to try these out.

  6. stefanie February 15, 2012 at 4:15 pm #

    Great projects! Makes me want to try them all!

  7. Cindy Lietz, Polymer Clay Tutor February 15, 2012 at 7:56 pm #

    I haven’t yet invested in alcohol ink markers, so thank you very much for the thorough review. I think they would be a nice addition to the studio supplies!

  8. Nancy ~ Inkcicles February 15, 2012 at 7:56 pm #

    Those Mepxy markers were amazing. I loved how well they blended and how juicy the ink was. I can’t say enough positive things about these markers! They are affordable and awesome! I’d love to own them all!

  9. aloha37 February 16, 2012 at 5:43 pm #

    How do these markers compare to Copic markers? My husband is going to buy me a set for my birthday which is next week and I am very interested in which you would recommend! Thanks so much.

  10. Maria February 18, 2012 at 12:49 am #

    I have not tested the copic markers and these at the same time. My best suggestion is to go to the art supply store and try the testers. Seeing how the different inks work (with side by side testing) is a great way to test the different brand markers and see which ones fit your creative needs best.

  11. Francie Horton February 21, 2012 at 10:06 am #

    The Copic markers have a grey line around the barrel on the brush tip (I believe) and after awhile it just becomes second nature when you’re using them. I would imagine the same thing is true for the Mepxy indicator.

    The Copics also soak thru most papers. I use them on a fairly heavy watercolor paper and I still get bleed-thru when I do alot of blending. Perhaps the nature of the beast? :D

    So, can you use these with the Copics since they’re both alcohol based? As large as the color selection is with Copics it might be nice to have additional colors as well.

    Nicely written article, btw. Makes me want to get out my markers and play!

  12. Els July 13, 2012 at 9:50 pm #

    What effect did the gesso/acrylic have on the marker nibs/tips? With Copic Sketch, which appears to be the closest equivalent, using them over gesso or acrylic or any other product that sloughs off with alcohol, ruins the nib/tip. I’d be interested in knowing if there’s a difference with that aspect of the Mepxy. I played with these at a large art gathering recently, and will very likely purchase some in the future. Your review is a terrific help in making my decision. Thank you!

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