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Tutorial: Heart Chicken Wire Memo Board

Today, I’m excited to be sharing the first of two tutorials for projects that I made that were on display at the Creativation show last month in the Buttons Galore booth. This heart chicken wire memo board was so fun to make, and I so enjoyed sharing it with so many people at the show!

[Disclaimer: My company, Nally Studios, is the social media & blog manager for Buttons Galore. I am also part of blogger programs for Cricut and Plaid, who provided some product used in this article. Some links in this article are affiliate links that pay this site a commission at no cost to you if you make a purchase after clicking.]

How to Make A Heart Chicken Wire Memo Board

Chicken wire is so hot for home decor, but using it doesn’t mean you have to create a design that is “farmhouse” looking. This bright, colorful heart chicken wire memo board will fit right in when it is hung up in my teenage daughter’s bright pink bedroom, and will be a great place to hang cards and pictures.

Supplies Needed:

This chicken wire memo board project is entirely made from scratch, cut from a sheet of plywood. The great thing about doing it that way is that it can be made to exactly the size that will work for the space that you have! (My heart is about 17″ high.)

To start this project, I needed a template to work from. If you have a steady hand, you could hand draw your cutting outlines on the plywood, but I prefer working with a template. To create my template, I used the basic shape tool in my Cricut Design Space Software to draw two hearts and merged them. Then, since my template was larger than the cut area on my Cricut, I used the rectangle tool to slice my heart into sections. Then I cut out all of the pieces and taped them back together to make my template!

heart template

After I made my template, I used it to trace an outline on my sheet of plywood. Then I cut out the heart outline with my jigsaw. To cut out the inside of the heart, I drilled a hole first with my largest drill bit. That gave me a place to insert my jigsaw blade as a starting point, and then I worked my way along the inside of the outline.

The 1/4″ plywood is surprisingly easy to cut and a heart is just gentle curves and straight lines – don’t be intimidated! (Don’t forget your safety glasses!)

Once the shape was cut out, I cleaned up the edges and the surface with sandpaper. Then I painted it with a beautiful shade of pink called “Vintage Victorian” from the Plaid FolkArt Home Decor Chalk Paint line.

buttons on heart memo board

After the paint was dry, I started on the button collage. It’s time consuming to do a collage like this, kind of like doing a jigsaw puzzle that you don’t have a picture for, but I find it kind of zen and relaxing. Having the background be painted is a little cheat – it gives room for error and allows the project to still look right if an area of buttons doesn’t quite fit together correctly. Working in short sections and then letting the glue dry before going further is best to minimize the risk of inadvertently shifting buttons out of position while you work.

Let the front dry completely before starting to work on attaching the chicken wire, to make sure everything is secure!

chicken wire

The chicken wire is a bit stabby to work with but if you are careful it’s possible to get it applied without too much trouble. The most important thing in this step to getting a nice finished piece is making sure that the chicken wire is pulled nice and flat and tight.

I started by cutting a piece of chicken wire that was just a bit larger than my heart. Then I worked in small sections attaching it to the back with hot glue, and pressing masking tape down over the hot glue immediately. (Thanks to Teryn at Vintage Romance Style for the no staple technique!)

Once I did one area, I went across to the opposite side and pulled the wire tight and did that area. Then I picked another spot and went opposite it. I worked my way around the whole heart by going back and forth.

applying chicken wire to frame

After all the glue was dry and cool, then I clipped off as much as I could of the wire pieces that were hanging out, leaving one loop of wire at the top of each curve of the heart to attach a hanger to.

I could have stopped there on my chicken wire memo board, and just attached a hanger, but my perfectionist side wasn’t happy with the messy looking back and wanted to make it look a bit prettier. So I got out a roll of Duck Tape I had on hand (conveniently in pink that matched my project). Laid down in short sections on the back of the heart, it both covered the masking tape & hot glue mess and sealed in stray ends of wire that could poke.

applying duct tape

For the final touch, I cut a piece of ribbon from the 28 Lilac Lane kit to use as a hanger and looped it around the wire I had left exposed. A drop of hot glue adhered the ribbon loops in place.

This same technique can be applied to any shape or size chicken wire memo board….just draw or create a template for the design that you want! What shape do you want to make?

how to make a chicken wire memo board

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Get Ready for July 4th with a Pallet Flag!

Pallet projects are very trendy right now in home decor. Pallets make the perfect base for rustic style flag projects. This pallet flag provides a twist on the usual flag design by replacing the blue field of stars with a cutout map of the United States with a string art star! Perfect for the 4th of July, this pallet flag will bring flea market style to your patriotic celebration!

[Disclosure: Products used in this project were supplied to Craft Critique by Plaid for promotional purposes but we maintain full editorial control of this content. Some links in this article are affiliate links that compensate Craft Critique when visitors make a purchase after clicking on them. Thank you for supporting Craft Critique when using our links!]

Pallet Flag

This pallet flag is created from two Plaid products – a 12″ x 16″ unfinished wood pallet, and a brand new wood string art cut out from their Bucilla String Creations brand.

Pallet Flag supplies

I started by painting the pallet base in two coats of White Adirondack chalk paint. Once that was dry, I taped off my stripes using painter’s tape. I wanted three white stripes and four red ones so I divided the vertical dimension by 7 and then started measuring in from the edge and filling in the tape.

Pallet Flag stripe painting

(Make sure to press the edges of the tape down securely to prevent the paint seeping under it. If it doesn’t seal properly you will find yourself having to do touch-ups after the tape is removed.)

After the tape was in place I painted the red paint over it to create the red stripes.

While waiting for the red paint to dry, I painted the map blue. Then the clear wax went onto both items after they were dry, and I buffed it to a nice soft sheen.

I die cut a star of approximately the size I wanted to string on my die cut machine to use as a template, but you can skip this step if you are confident free handing the stringing. I was careful when threading my string to not have any threads on the back pass anywhere but directly underneath threads on the front. With a bit of forethought to the pattern of stringing, it can be done.

The finished map was attached to the pallet background with hot glue. And my flag was all ready to hang to celebrate the 4th of July, or any patriotic occasion!

Supplies:

Make a pallet flag with a U.S. map on it!

A look at the Krylon 2016 Product Line

This year Krylon is introducing some fabulous new products for both indoor and outdoor home decor projects. They will still offer their traditional spray paints that we all know and love, but this year Krylon has added some fun new paints that allow crafters like me to be a bit more creative both indoors and out. The Krylon booth at a trade show I attended displayed some fun home decor project ideas.

The booth was created to look like a home with DIY home decor projects displayed booth inside the home and outside the home. When you first entered their booth, you were greeted by this creative display of DIY outdoor home decor projects that were done using various Krylon products.

The Krylon House

One of my favorite products is their textured spray paint line. The planters below are painted with the Krylon “Stone Coarse Texture” Spray Paint. I love how they make the planters “pop”.

Krylon Planters

The texture is hard to see in this picture, but it looks amazing in person. It feels like sand but with a slightly rougher texture.

Close up of the Planter decorated with Krylon Stone Coarse Texture Spray Paint

I found the best way to use the textured spray paint is to apply even coats and allow the piece to dry for around six to eight hours between coats. I found two to three coats gave me the best results. You may find that waiting for the paint to completely dry between coats (instead of just a few hours) will give you a much nicer result.

I used the textured paint to spray paint a plastic garden statue to make it look like metal. It worked really well for me.

Water cans painted with Krylon's Chalky Finish Spray Paint

Krylon is right on top of home decor trends in both their products and their color offerings. I have seen so many fun home decor projects on Pinterest featuring various chalky paints. I loved the DIY outdoor home decor watering can project displayed at the base of the garden that also does double duty displaying the house (booth number) address. It is a really fun outdoor home decor project that uses the Krylon “Chalky Finish” spray paint.

Being able to paint metal and get a similar “Chalky Paint” result is a real bonus and time saver for me. I am going to borrow the watering can idea and paint some of the planters that line the front of my house. I think I will also place some light-reflecting address numbers (which are easier to see at night) on them to make it easier for family and friends to find my house when they visit.

Outdoor Wicker Chair DIY Project by Krylon using the Colormaster Spray Paints.

If you have some outdoor furniture you want to give a face lift, then the Krylon “Colormaster Paint + Primer”series of spray paints is a great tool.

A close up of the finish on the Wicker chair painted with the Krylon Colormaster Spray Paint.

It adheres really well to a variety of materials and gives a nice opaque coverage. The wicker chair in the photo above was originally blue and was painted using the Krylon Colormaster paint. The Krylon Colormaster line is available in a wide selection of colors and is fairly easy to find in stores.

Wicker Baskets Painted with Krylon Spray Paint.

The Krylon Colormaster “Paint & Primer” line is perfect for use in indoor DIY home decor projects too. It adheres to a variety of materials, making it easy to use for accent colors in home decor projects. I have used this paint to cover a variety of objects in my home. I love how well the paint covers, and how it looks when used.

I have found that this paint can be layered to achieve a very opaque look. It depends on the base color. I have covered beige with only one coat but found dark blue to require a second coat to give full coverage.

The sprayer tip on this can is great. I found I did not have a sore finger after painting my project like I did with other spray paint products. Another thing that keeps me buying more cans of this paint is that I found I don’t have the worries of runs or drips with this paint.

This is wonderful paint to work with, as long as you follow the manufacturer’s suggestions for use. Each paint has directions on the can, and you can also find more information on the Krylon website.

 

Project | Halloween Word Art Sign

[The paints used in this project have been provided to Craft Critique by Plaid for review.]

Halloween Word Art Tutorial

I love to put signs outside the house, and inside too. They are a fun accent item that can be personalized to suit my décor. I am also a big fan of those inspirational signs and wood blocks that I see at my local department stores. The ones I’ve seen for Halloween were pretty fancy and around $15 to $20 dollars each. I realized that I could easily make a personalized one for a lot less.

The steps for this Halloween word art sign project are the same basic concept to my chalkboard sign project, but using a different type of paint as a base makes the finished product completely different. This is a great example of how learning basic skills can then translate into a wide variety of projects by switching up the materials you are using. Continue Reading →

Project | Halloween Chalkboard Sign

[The chalkboard paint used in this article has been provided to Craft Critique by Plaid for review.]

Halloween Chalkboard Project

Chalkboard signs never go out of style! Here is an easy way to incorporate chalkboard art into your seasonal home décor with this quick and easy Halloween Chalkboard Sign Tutorial.

Supplies:

  • Rectangular wood sign (10”x3.47”.13”)
  • 16 gauge craft wire
  • Martha Stewart Chalkboard Craft Paint – Black
  • Wire cutter
  • Long nose pliers
  • Needle nose pliers
  • Paint brush
  • Chalk
  • Drill
  • Drill bit
  • Sand paper and file

Continue Reading →

Comparison | Painting Mason Jars

Painting-Mason-JarsMason jars are very trendy lately, and painting them has been catching on as well. But they aren’t the easiest surface to work with…how do you know what to use? I decided to buy a box of pint mason jars, experiment with various paint mediums, and share the results with Craft Critique’s readers to find out!

After experimenting over the course of doing this project, I learned a few tips that help to improve the results when painting mason jars.

The first thing I learned was that priming the jars can help with both the application and the final appearance of the paint if you are using an opaque paint (obviously for a transparent color, the priming would show). I used Krylon ColorMaster Primer in White to prime most of the jars that I painted below, placing them upside down on a scrap piece of 1×2 and standing outside to spray them. Then I propped the 1×2 against the side of my desk while the jar dried. One coat of primer was sufficient to provide a base for painting over. Continue Reading →