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Tag Archives | Tim Holtz

What is the difference between original Distress Ink and Distress Oxide?

Tim Holtz recently announced that twelve new colors are being added to his new Distress Oxide ink line, bringing to a total of 24 the colors available in that line. But this new announcement of expansion in the Distress Oxide color palette may have some of our readers who haven’t tried the inks yet asking “what is the difference between the original Distress ink and new Distress Oxide ink?”

Let’s take a look!

[Disclosure: This article contains some affiliate or sponsor links.]

Distress Oxide ink pads

To run my comparison, I used the six Ranger Distress Oxide inks that I have purchased, along with their matching inks from my collection of original Ranger Distress Inks (some of which were provided to me by Ranger at the time of their release).

As an initial comparison, I stamped the inks side by side on plain white cardstock. I specifically chose these Tim Holtz silhouette stamps because their large solid stamping areas are the type of design that make it challenging to get a perfect impression. Plus they give a really good look at the color tones of each ink.

The male silhouette in each pair below is stamped in original Distress ink, and the female profile is stamped in Distress Oxide ink.

Distress Ink vs Distress Oxide stamping

At first glance, most of the pairs don’t seem that different. The color tones on most are fairly close to each other. However, one thing is evident after closer examination (and has been seen in my other use of the ink). The new Distress Oxide image is cleaner, with fewer light spots, than the original Distress Ink in most of the images. Because the Oxide ink is juicier, it is more forgiving in creating a good quality image with a challenging stamp design and on a less than optimal surface.

Distress Ink vs Distress Oxide stamping

Moving to stamping on manila tags, a better surface for the inks, and the difference in quality is somewhat less obvious between the two inks, but still slightly noticeable.

One of the key features that is being promoted for Distress Oxide is that it “oxidizes” when exposed to water. But what, exactly, is oxidation? According to Wikipedia, oxidation is “the loss of electrons or an increase in oxidation state by a molecule, atom, or ion.” Say what? What does that mean in craft terms?

Distress Oxide vs Distress Ink

Distress Ink (left) and Distress Oxide (right)

Above, these two tags have been dragged through ink that was rubbed on my craft sheet, and then had water dripped on them. Both tags end up with light looking spots where the drips were. But if you look closely at the spots, there is a key difference. When water was dripped on the tag with the original Distress Ink, the spots “bleached” and got light. It’s almost as if all color has been removed from those spots. In comparison, on the Distress Oxide tag, the spots still have plenty of saturated color in them even though they appear lighter from the water. That is what oxidation looks like in Distress Oxide ink!

Distress vs Distress Oxide test

original Distress ink (left) vs Distress Oxide (right)

Another major difference – translucency – becomes obvious between the two inks when I tried doing a direct-to-paper technique on a dark colored background on these animal cards cut from some idea-ology paper. You can see above how much more opaque the Distress Oxide inks are on the bear and the kangaroo cards than their counterparts in original Distress Ink on the pig and elephant cards. The difference is especially obvious on the Cracked Pistachio inked cards. On the elephant card, the original Distress ink is almost completely transparent, just tinting the card but not impacting the visibility of the image. This is a huge contrast to the Distress Oxide of the same color on the kangaroo card, which completely obliterates the image!

Distress vs Distress Oxide comparison

The more that you handle and manipulate these inks, the more subtle differences that you notice. For this test above, I rubbed the ink pads on my craft sheet, spritzed the sheet with water, and then dragged the tags through the ink. Both tags resulted in a marbled look with this technique. But if you look closely, you’ll see on the right above that the Distress Oxide ink pooled and flowed more, whereas the original Distress maintained more structure. You can even see striations in the tag on the left from where it was dragged, whereas the other tag is more shapeless in design.

Distress Ink layered tag

Distress Ink layered tag

Another of the things you will notice is how differently these inks layer. One of the big advantages being touted by Tim Holtz in his Distress Oxide demos since the product’s introduction has been that the product can be layered without getting muddy, and you can see in these examples I created how that works.

Above, I created a tag with five different original Distress Inks that were applied in three different layers, by swiping on the craft sheet, spritzing with water and then dragging the tag through. You can see that by the last layer, at least part of the tag had turned to muddy brown.

Contrast that to the tag below, created with the same five colors of ink but in Distress Oxide, and using the same technique. Although original Distress got muddy at three layers, this tag is still showing vibrant color after five layers of inking with Distress Oxide.

Disress Oxide layered tag 2

Some of the differences are subtle, and some not so subtle. But they add up to Distress Oxide being an ink that is an excellent complement to original Distress ink. Used together, the two inks give paper crafters and mixed media artists the ability for almost granular control over the properties of the ink at each stage of their project. Do I want my purple to blend or pool? Do I want my green to be transparent or opaque? Do I need my colors to layer, or not? You can decide the look, and select the appropriate ink – while staying inside the Distress palette.

Distress Oxide ink pads

Ranger Tim Holtz Distress Oxide ink pads have an MSRP of $5.99. Twelve colors were released in Winter 2017, and an additional twelve colors have just been announced and are currently shipping to stores. Distress Oxide is available at Scrapbook.com, A Cherry On Top, Amazon.com, and other crafts retailers.

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Review | Introduction to Ranger Tim Holtz Distress Glitter

Ranger Tim Holtz Distress GlitterHere’s another winner in the deep product line from Tim Holtz and Ranger Industries, which is always well thought out with perfectly matching colors and attractive packaging.

Distress Glitter comes in 24 different colors and coordinates with the nostalgic palette of other Distress products . Somewhere between a fine glitter and a glass glitter, the blend is best described as a vintage mica creating a unique glitter product. MSRP is $5.49, in my opinion a good value for a quality product that will last you quite a long time! Continue Reading →

Review | Tim Holtz Distress Glitter

Tim Holtz is know as “The Man” in the scrapbooking industry for many reasons. He is the most famous male name in the scrapbooking community. Tim’s Distress line of color mediums manufactured by Ranger Industries is immensely popular with all styles of crafters from the shabby chic artist to the clean more graphic style artists, and he also creates products that are gender neutral since they appeal to both males and females.. Tim is also know for his innovative products that advance the industry toward more user friendly multi-functional products. For that reason alone, I knew his new Distress Glitters were going to be something special and they did not disappoint!

The Ranger Ink website describes Distress Glitter as a nostalgic pattern of unique glitter that mimics the look of vintage mica. A quick Google search gave me a better understanding what mica is:

Mica is a mineral that comes in a variety of colors and can be easily separated into thin transparent sheets.In addition to being beautiful, it’s non-toxic, tough, chemically inert, transparent, and waterproof. via MicaSnow.com

Based on the images I found online, vintage mica was used largely to represent snow or provide shine in Christmas decorations and other crafty projects in the early 1900’s. I remember seeing it on the edges of pine cones in the winter. I may even remember using it in an arts and crafts project in school.

Distress Glitter very much resembles mica because of its shine properties. I found that the Distress Glitter, unlike traditional glitter, has a color cast shine to it. What does that mean? It means when you tilt your project it doesn’t reflect silver as traditional glitter does. It, instead, gives off the color that it truly represents in a beautiful subdued glimmer.

Distress Glitter MacaronUp

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Review | Ranger Tim Holtz Distress Paint

I am a big fan of Ranger’s products and use a lot of different items from their extensive product line in my art journals. I also follow a number of crafting blogs and have seen many of my favorite artists demonstrating the effects and looks that they can get with this new line of paints. So, I am excited to post my review of the Tim Holtz Distress Paint that was new earlier this year, and how I think it can best be used.

The Ranger Tim Holtz Distress Paints are available in 30 of the Distress palette colors, plus 3 metallics. For this review, I worked with a sample in Forest Moss.

Distress Paint Continue Reading →

Coats & Clark, Tim Holtz Announce Line of Quilt Fabric

Fans of Tim Holtz who also take part in sewing and quilting activities will have something to celebrate soon as Tim announced today a new partnership with Coats & Clark that will have him designing that company’s debut fabric line.

Coats & Clark is well-known to sewers and quilters for their thread and sewing notions, and lovers of knit & crochet for their Red Heart yarn and their Susan Bates brand needles & hooks. But fabric will be a new endeavor for Coats.

The new line, called Eclectic Elements, will feature 24 SKUs of fabric designs that will be familiar to Tim Holtz fans from his paper lines. Some of the designs are being produced in two different color tones, taupe and neutral (seen below). The 100% cotton fabric is 44″ wide and will be available on 15 yard bolts. For quilters, the fabric will be available in fat quarters, design rolls, 5” and 10” charm packs and fat eighths, while it is being marketed for papercrafters in 6″ and 12″ fabric crafting packs. Continue Reading →

CHA Winter 2013: Sizzix

Ready for a tour of the Sizzix booth from CHA Winter 2013? I’m thrilled to say that I can give you an insider tour of this booth, as I’ve been an in-house designer for Sizzix for six years! I’m so proud to work for such a prominent brand in the craft world.

This year, Sizzix deepened their partnerships by teaming up with some more of the best companies in the market: Hampton Arts, Doodle Bug, Echo Park, Prima, 7 Gypsies. The list will continue to grow in the future, I’m sure.

First up (on the left below) is Karen Burniston, and her latest “Pop and Cut” designs. She has a new label card and butterfly card that is just fabulous, as it decorates the inside as well as the outside of the card at the same time. This is one of three lines that I made all the samples and packaging for, so I’ve already had the chance to work with this wonderful product.

On the right below is the latest release from Scrappy Cat. This line offers some beautiful floral designs, and Debi did a beautiful display with touches of the sea with corals and teal.

sizzix 1 Continue Reading →

CHA Winter 2013: Innovations Showcase Products (Part 1)

Each show, CHA holds its Innovations Showcase, which serves as a combination media event and buyer preview. The top 20 entrants in the Innovations Showcase (as pre-determined by  a panel of celebrity media judges) take part in a speed round of presentations to the audience, and then attendees get a few minutes to visit each entrant’s booth around the outer edge of the room to talk to the various manufacturers about their products. (At CHA Winter 2013, Craft Critique’s own editor Nancy Nally was one of the celebrity media judges!)

CHA Winter 2013

Needless to say, we arrived with our cameras and notebooks in hand to get the most information possible in the short amount of time allowed for our readers. Our first stop was to see Julianna C. Hudgins demonstrating her new jewel loom from Beadalon.

Beadalon Jewel Loom by Juliana Hudgins

Beadalon Jewel Loom by Juliana Hudgins

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