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CHA Summer 2011: Copic Markers

Copic Markers have quickly become the alcohol marker of choice or rubber stampers and scrapbookers alike. Here at CHA, it was nice to see all 346 colors up close.

Plus, it is nice to see designers like Colleen Schaan working with the markers and getting some of her pro tips.

Coloring enthusiasts are going to love the new Shadows and Shading by Marianne Walker. This beginners guide will explain light placement and includes guides as well.

Copic also works with their air brushing systems.

Marianne Walker was there to show us how easy it is to use with the markers.

These atyou Spica Glitter Pens are a great way to add a little bling to any project. They come in 24 colors and feature a no-clog nib.

The biggest news at the show is the introduction of Copic’s new website, Copic Color. Copic Color is a community for people who love Copic markers. This new website allows people to keep track of the markers they have and want, create custom color palettes to share with their friends, post artwork made with Copic Markers, find Copic Marker dealers carrying the colors they want, and best of all it is optimized for mobile devices.


And if that wasn’t enough, here is some of the great samples featured in the Copic booth.

 

 

 

 

 

Are you a Copic fanatic? What do you love about them? And what do you think about the new Copic Color? We would love to know!

CHA Copic Products

Copic continues to give us hundreds of markers to drool over!


Naturally, where there are markers, there is paper and lots of it. Copic delivers new “blending cards” for us to layer colors to our heart’s content.

With no “touch-a-vision”, it’s hard to convey how this acid-free, sturdy (92 lb. cover weight), smooth, matte finish bright white paper is making people happy in ways you wouldn’t think. No feathering when you blend your markers and it’s compatible with laser and inkjet printers, too.

The uber-talented Marriane Walker demonstrated her skills for us…

Along with the blending card, look for the double sided high tack tape. Originally used in the picture framing industry, crafters in Australia started using this for their projects. The tape is the easiest double sided tape to tear (saw it with my own eyes), heat resistant, perfect for instant hemming or attaching embellishments. It holds holds well on different surfaces.


Mask It is flexible masking film with medium tack. Easy to cut, protect the areas you want to mask, and go nuts with your coloring. It also works well on different surfaces.

Do you love Copic as much as we do?  Aren’t you excited to try these new papers?

Click on the link at the top of the page to visit Craft Critique for comments, giveaways and more!

Cardstock Comparison

Reported by: Erin Bassett
With so many brands of premium cardstock out on the market now, I thought it would be nice to really look closely at some of the major brands and see if there was any big differences between them.
I decided to compare the ones I use most often: American Crafts, Bazzill, and Stampin’ Up. Here’s some of the similarities and differences you’ll find when purchasing them. You can download the chart below here:
Since I’m comparing them using the stash I have on hand, I don’t have all of the same textures for them. So, I was curious to see if that would play a part in my testing. I used the “orange peel” textured Bazzill cardstock, the “smooth” Stampin’ Up cardstock and the only texture that the American Crafts cardstock comes in (which is similar to a canvas texture).
Now as far as actual use goes, I didn’t really notice any major differences between them when I cut out some die cuts with my Cricut. I cut out the same shapes using the same settings and they all cut out about the same….not really a surprise since they are all the same weight of cardstock. (Although the Stampin’ Up cardstock seems a bit stiffer then the others.)
I also tested how Copic markers would work on them. As expected, I didn’t notice a difference.
One other test I preformed on the cardstocks is how well they folded. Nothing ticks me off more then paper that cracks when it’s folded. -It can make cards and other paper crafts look a bit tacky. Well, I’m happy to report that none of these cardstocks did that!!
Basically I think one’s choice between these cardstocks would boil down to the color and texture of cardstock needed for a craft project and how much it costs.
Pros:
  • American Crafts cardstock tends be the most inexpensive
  • Bazzill cardstock has a huge variety of colors and textures
  • Stampin Up has smooth cardstock that is perfect for stamping on
  • All three cardstocks preformed about the same
  • All three cardstocks are available for purchase online.
Cons:
  • With so many great papers you may run out of space!
Resources:
Do YOU have a favorite cardstock? Tell us what it is and why it’s your favorite.
Click on the link at the top of the page to visit Craft Critique for comments, giveaways and more!