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A Look at my Overhauled Stamp Storage

One of my most frequently used supplies are my stamps. So it’s very important that I have a stamp storage system that works to make my stamps easy to find, and that is flexible and expandable. I have struggled for years to find the right solution for my stamps, as well as my 6×6 pads and my metal dies. But I think in my latest room overhaul, I finally have the solution I’ve been searching for.

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Like many stampers, I’m now using stamp storage based on the system designed by Jennifer McGuire. (Click here to see a YouTube playlist of her videos about the system. But set aside a chunk of time because Jennifer will have you organizing all the things by the time you are done with her amazing organizing playlist!)

But of course, as with every organization project I take on…I modified it somewhat from the inspiration source to fit my preferences and way of working – to make it work for me.

Stamp Storage

The system is based around plastic bins, with plastic bag pouches to hold stamps, and dividers cut from plastic pocket folders. For my bins, I use an InterDesign Divided Fridge Bin and four InterDesign Linus Pantry Bins. One of the pantry bins is devoted to my large Tim Holtz stamp sets, and the rest of the bins are used for a variety of things, including stamps, dies, and 6×6 paper pads.

stamp storage

My original stamp pockets were from Avery Elle, but now since those have disappeared I use a brand called CheckOutStore available on Amazon.

For my larger stamps, I use three other sizes of bags from ClearBags:

I cut the flaps off of the bags that have them, to create open top pouches.

For the paper inserts, I use 110lb Georgia Pacific cardstock that I buy affordably at Walmart in large packs. My labelmaker for labeling my stamp pockets is a Dymo Labelmanager 160 that I previously wrote a sponsored review about.

The larger flap bag (B66XL) is used for most of my supplies. I use it for my larger stamps, embossing folders, and several other things.

Background Stamp Storage

I also use those bags to hold multiple small stamps, such as my sets of Tim Holtz mini Blueprints.

Small Stamp Storage

The smaller flap bag (B6x6) I use primarily for my 6×6 stencils.

6x6 stencil storage

One of the largest places where I deviated from Jennifer’s system is with my metal die storage. Instead of using pockets, I opted to use the 6×7 magnet cards from Stamp-n-Storage. They fit perfectly filed in my bins alongside my other items.

Since the magnet cards are not exactly cheap, sometimes I put multiple small die sets from the same company on the same card. This saves money as well as saving room in my file bins.

Magnetic Die Storage

Like Jennifer, I also use this bin system to store my 6×6 paper pads. I still need to make some dividers for them. I plan to sort them into a few major themes such as various holidays. I also keep a few other things, such as paper scraps that have been cut into a standard size, and a few Close to my Heart stamps, in this section.

6x6 paper pad storage

I’m a major paper hoarder, especially for the collections that I love the most, but that can get really messy in my paper files. I found a way to solve that in the file for the 6×6 paper pads using the B66XL flap bags. Once I start using a paper pad and it has scraps that are getting annoying in the file bin, I put the pad in one of the bags. It allows me to still place it in the file with the others, but keeps the pesky little scraps contained!

6x6 paper pad storage

Initial set-up for this stamp storage system required an investment of both time and money, but now that it is up and running, it is relatively easy to maintain. I have a basket of supplies for my organizing systems that lives in my craft room closet, and when I have new things to put away I just pull it out on the desk to use to get my new goodies all put away.

Are you using the Jennifer McGuire stamp storage system? What modifications have you made to it?

CHA Craft Storage: Simply Renee

Seriously? How could you not drool over the prospect of this crafty storage? The new All-In-One Clip It Up system from Simply Renee looks totally to die for! The All-In-One Base has two 78″ tall poles on a 26″ wide base for a whole score of storage.

The pole is composed of 1″ pieces so you can easily set it up with the combination of elements that work best for you like the All-In-One Single Ribbon or Double Ribbon holders that work really well for ribbon rolls or rolls of fabric.


There are also amazing Clip It Up Trays that easily spin without wobble and have helpful little dividers so that things don’t tip over in the tray.

The spinning arm from the floor model also works on the All-In-One Base for your classic Clip It Up needs, whether that’s stamps, paper, embellishments, fabric, sewing patterns or pretty much anything else you can pinch with a clip.

Click on the link at the top of the page to visit Craft Critique for comments, giveaways and more!

Unity Stamp Co.

Editor’s Note: We’d like to welcome Anne-Marie Teo to our team of staff reporters… this is her first article for Craft Critique! Be sure to click on her name to visit her terrific blog, and leave her a little love in the comments below!

Reported by Anne-Marie Teo

One of the most innovative stamp companies to emerge onto the crafting scene this last year has got to be Unity Stamp Co..

I first saw their unique mounting system for rubber stamps at the Craft and Hobby Association show in Anaheim, California in 2008. I have never been a fan of wood-mounted rubber stamps simply because they take up a lot of storage space and they cost noticeably more than their acrylic counterparts. But Unity Stamp Co. has devised a unique mounting system that not only helps you to save on storage space, you can use these ‘handles’ with your acrylic stamps as well.

The handles come in 4 different sizes and are made to fit perfectly with Unity’s wooden cassette stamps. Match the letter on the handle to the letter on the stamp, slide the cassette into the handle and stamp. You can turn the handles over and use them with your acrylic stamps as well.

Unity Stamp Co.’s range of stamps include the cassette-mounted stamps as well as unmounted rubber stamps. They have released an extensive range of images over the year, and there are singles as well as sets to choose from. There are new releases almost every week, and Unity stamps cater to all paper crafters: from cardmakers to scrapbookers.

Pros:

  • Unique, space-saving mounting system
  • Stamp handles that can be used with all other unmounted rubber and acrylic stamps
  • Deeply-etched stamps for cardmakers and scrapbookers

Cons:

  • Not as extensively available in brick and mortar or online stores since they are still a relatively new company

You can buy Unity Stamp Co.’s mounting system and stamps from their online store at unitystampco.com.

In conclusion, I have preferred red rubber stamps since I’ve started using Unity. The stamped images are much clearer than images from acrylic stamps, and I haven’t had to think of how to store wood-mounted stamps.

Have you tried Unity yet? Let us know what you think!

Click on the link at the top of the page to visit Craft Critique for comments, giveaways and more!